Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep

I came across this poem recently in StumbleUpon. It really moved me and I wanted to share it with you.

It is written by Mary Elizabeth Frye.

Mary Elizabeth Frye (Dayton, Ohio, 13 November, 1905 – Baltimore 15 September 2004) was a Baltimore housewife and florist, best known as the author of the poem “Do not stand at my grave and weep,” written in 1932.

She was born Mary Elizabeth Clark, and was orphaned at the age of three. In 1927 she married Claud Frye.

The identity of the author of the poem was unknown until the late 1990s, when Frye revealed that she had written it. Her claim was later proven by Abigail Van Buren. Her poem was also used in the one of the Norwegian protocols, to express condolences for the the sorrow that struck the country July 22nd, 2011. – Wikipedia

 

Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep

 

Do not stand at my grave and weep,

I am not there; I do not sleep.

I am a thousand winds that blow,

I am the diamond glints on snow,

I am the sun on ripened grain,

I am the gentle autumn rain.

When you awaken in the morning’s hush

I am the swift uplifting rush

Of quiet birds in circling flight.

I am the soft starlight at night.

Do not stand at my grave and cry,

I am not there; I did not die.

 

Photo Credits

Photo from the Microsoft Clip Art Collection

 


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Comments

  1. avatar says

    This poem really touched my heart. The poet has written this with so much feeling, each word is etched into my heart. It is a long time since I read a poem so intense and powerful. Thanks for sharing this.

  2. avatarmary blakley says

    I don’t think i have ever been so moved! Where has this been for heaven’s sake I guess
    waiting for a special moment a special time. It is so very beautiful I just had to post and I have never
    posted before. Thankyou for putting this out there for all to see.

  3. avatar says

    Thanks for sharing this very touching poem – so full of spirit and soul – my ideal is to feel this connected every day before, during and after I ‘die’ – this planet we call earth is truly magical.

  4. avatar says

    I think we as humans all want to believe we live an eternal life as part of nature in this never ending circle. I think the writer shows our fear of death and the ending of what we feel is a beautiful thing, to think we turn to nothing and just disappear is not a satisfying thought.

  5. avatar says

    I have come across this lovely poem many times and was most interested to learn it is now accredited to this lady. I am a poet myself (published) and can relate absolutely to the lovely words.

  6. avatar says

    Getting more and more interested into the world of poetry, starting writting some verses too, from once in a while, I couldn’t help but being touched by this great piece of work. Thanks for sharing it :)

  7. avatarEd says

    In my yearbook from 1972 , this poem was dedicated to a couple of frriends who died in the senior year of high school , It was listed as ” anonymous “. thank you for sharing this poems real author !

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